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Alumni Spotlight: Nate Boyer

Lee Strasberg Theatre & Film Institute alumni Nate Boyer’s career has been anything but ordinary. He spent 10 years in the military as a Green Beret and then became a walk-on for the Seattle Seahawks. So how did he come to train at LSTFI? “I was interested in acting at 19,” said Nate. “I had never performed in any way except sports.”

After finishing his military career, he was looking into schools that supported the G.I. Bill. LSTFI offers One and Two-year Conservatory opportunities for veterans under the G.I. Bill. He was drawn to LSTFI because he knew he would be “working with others who are passionate.” “[Strasberg] is small and intimate, that was appealing to me… I just knew that is what I was going to do next.”

“The true reality of acting is that you’re still in your experience of reality, just in a different person’s set of experiences.”

Nate Boyer on truth in acting

Being Changed by The Method

“Something I have struggled with is stillness… [Stillness] comes with relaxation and feeling comfortable.” The Method has given Nate the tools to not only be a better actor, but a more understanding person. “As an actor, you have to really believe what you character believes… you [sometimes] have to empathize with things that go against your moral compass.” Being in the mind of someone different from you forces you to think the way they do. The Method “has forced me to… let the character dictate the way I feel.”

Nate takes inspiration from Ben Kingsely’s quote, “my main currency is in silence and stillness.” Nate’s Method Acting training has taught him that “unnecessary movement comes form unnecessary tension… it is essential for an actor’s body to be grounded.”

“David [Lee Strasberg] says the tiger in the jungle is heavy like a mountain and light as a feather at the same time… An actor must roll with the punches.”

Nate Boyer on acting

Telling Important Stories

Being a veteran, Nate finds it inspiring to tell stories of fellow veterans. Stories of veterans are “very personal” for Nate. “Veterans have such interesting stories,” and Nate wants to share their stories. “In Hollywood, people want to find what kind of connection you have… they trust that I’ll tell the story right.”

Currently, Nate is working on a developing a podcast with the History Channel that tells stories of World War II veterans. 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the end of WWII. For Nate, it is important to catalog those stories “before they leave us forever.” Additionally, Nate spent last month filming for a new movie called The Secret of Sinchanee. The production is set the in woods of Massachusetts and features a team half comprised of veterans. The filming is still in the filming process, and Nate plays a character named Detective Drew Carter.

“I think my experience in the military help shape my scope of open mindedness… You have to learn to listen. We usually forget that people have different perspectives.”

Nate Boyer

Connecting with Others, On the Field and On Stage

In 2016, football star, Colin Kapernick began protesting police violence by sitting during the national anthem. Being a former Green Beret, Nate was contacted a lot by the media to ask what he thought of Colin. “I was a big fan [of Colin]… I felt like it was time to share my perspective and why I respect his rights.” Nate continued that there are a lot of hard things happening in America now, “a lot of hatred… It was a frustrating time to be in America.” Nate supported Kapernick and wrote an open letter to him suggesting that he kneel instead of sit, in order to show continued respect for troops. “I want to be a bridge builder,” said Nate. People can “disagree in a respectful, productive way. “

Image result for nate boyer and colin kaepernick
Nate Boyer standing next to Colin Kapernick kneeling

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COVID-19

Dear Students and Prospective Students,

As news of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to develop, we wanted to take time to reassure our community that The Lee Strasberg Theatre & Film Institute is monitoring circumstances on a regular basis. We are committed to the well-being and education of our students, faculty and staff. Following in step as other universities and schools, we have transitioned to holding classes remotely in ways that are meaningful.

The Spring 2020 term will begin on April 20th.

These are unique times worthy of serious thought and implementing measures of caution. We trust that our Community will, as always, join together, to find new ways to collaborate, innovate, and continue doing the work we care so deeply about.

Please be sure to follow us on social media for events and updates during this time where we're all Safer at Home.
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